Steve Jobs snakker ut om Flash

Steve Jobs snakker ut om Flash

Adobe- og Apple-ansatte, journalister, bloggere og analytikere har alle hatt sine meninger om kranglingen mellom Adobe og Apple om Flash. Nå har Steve Jobs tatt fatt i pennen og skrevet et av hans velkjente «åpne brev». Steve oppsummerer og begrunner hvorfor Flash ikke finnes på iPhone eller iPad.

Hovedargumentene til Apple-sjefen Steve Jobs er relativt velkjente og valide. Steve og Apple mener at Flash sin teknologi ikke er «åpen» som Adobe selv hevder. Flash er en 100% properitær teknologi på, mens Apple på sin side satser på åpne standarder når det gjelder web hevder Steve Jobs. HTML5, CSS3 og JavaScript er alle åpne standarder som kan leses av alle moderne nettlesere, uten at man trenger plugins i sin nettleser.

Steve Jobs mener også at Flash er for tregt, ustabilt og ressurskrevende til at det kan kjøres på iPhone eller iPad og samtidig gi en bra brukeropplevelse samt lang batterilevetid. Apple, har ifølge Steve, invitert Adobe til å vise fram en rask og stabil versjon av Flash ved flere anledninger, men selskapet har ikke kommet i mål med dette skal vi tro Apple.

Steve mener at Apple har tatt et fornuftig valg og droppet Flash for å gå for mer åpne og sikre standarder. Han avslutter med å oppfordre Adobe til å heller lage gode verktøy for HTML5-produksjon framfor å klage på at Apple «beveger seg inn i framtiden».

Hele Steve Jobs brev kan leses under eller hos Apple.

Apple has a long relationship with Adobe. In fact, we met Adobe’s founders when they were in their proverbial garage. Apple was their first big customer, adopting their Postscript language for our new Laserwriter printer. Apple invested in Adobe and owned around 20% of the company for many years. The two companies worked closely together to pioneer desktop publishing and there were many good times. Since that golden era, the companies have grown apart. Apple went through its near death experience, and Adobe was drawn to the corporate market with their Acrobat products. Today the two companies still work together to serve their joint creative customers – Mac users buy around half of Adobe’s Creative Suite products – but beyond that there are few joint interests.

I wanted to jot down some of our thoughts on Adobe’s Flash products so that customers and critics may better understand why we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. Adobe has characterized our decision as being primarily business driven – they say we want to protect our App Store – but in reality it is based on technology issues. Adobe claims that we are a closed system, and that Flash is open, but in fact the opposite is true. Let me explain.

First, there’s “Open”.

Adobe’s Flash products are 100% proprietary. They are only available from Adobe, and Adobe has sole authority as to their future enhancement, pricing, etc. While Adobe’s Flash products are widely available, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlled entirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe. By almost any definition, Flash is a closed system.

Apple has many proprietary products too. Though the operating system for the iPhone, iPod and iPad is proprietary, we strongly believe that all standards pertaining to the web should be open. Rather than use Flash, Apple has adopted HTML5, CSS and JavaScript – all open standards. Apple’s mobile devices all ship with high performance, low power implementations of these open standards. HTML5, the new web standard that has been adopted by Apple, Google and many others, lets web developers create advanced graphics, typography, animations and transitions without relying on third party browser plug-ins (like Flash). HTML5 is completely open and controlled by a standards committee, of which Apple is a member.

Apple even creates open standards for the web. For example, Apple began with a small open source project and created WebKit, a complete open-source HTML5 rendering engine that is the heart of the Safari web browser used in all our products. WebKit has been widely adopted. Google uses it for Android’s browser, Palm uses it, Nokia uses it, and RIM (Blackberry) has announced they will use it too. Almost every smartphone web browser other than Microsoft’s uses WebKit. By making its WebKit technology open, Apple has set the standard for mobile web browsers.

Second, there’s the “full web”.

Adobe has repeatedly said that Apple mobile devices cannot access “the full web” because 75% of video on the web is in Flash. What they don’t say is that almost all this video is also available in a more modern format, H.264, and viewable on iPhones, iPods and iPads. YouTube, with an estimated 40% of the web’s video, shines in an app bundled on all Apple mobile devices, with the iPad offering perhaps the best YouTube discovery and viewing experience ever. Add to this video from Vimeo, Netflix, Facebook, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, ESPN, NPR, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, People, National Geographic, and many, many others. iPhone, iPod and iPad users aren’t missing much video.

Another Adobe claim is that Apple devices cannot play Flash games. This is true. Fortunately, there are over 50,000 games and entertainment titles on the App Store, and many of them are free. There are more games and entertainment titles available for iPhone, iPod and iPad than for any other platform in the world.

Third, there’s reliability, security and performance.

Symantec recently highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009. We also know first hand that Flash is the number one reason Macs crash. We have been working with Adobe to fix these problems, but they have persisted for several years now. We don’t want to reduce the reliability and security of our iPhones, iPods and iPads by adding Flash.

In addition, Flash has not performed well on mobile devices. We have routinely asked Adobe to show us Flash performing well on a mobile device, any mobile device, for a few years now. We have never seen it. Adobe publicly said that Flash would ship on a smartphone in early 2009, then the second half of 2009, then the first half of 2010, and now they say the second half of 2010. We think it will eventually ship, but we’re glad we didn’t hold our breath. Who knows how it will perform?

Fourth, there’s battery life.

To achieve long battery life when playing video, mobile devices must decode the video in hardware; decoding it in software uses too much power. Many of the chips used in modern mobile devices contain a decoder called H.264 – an industry standard that is used in every Blu-ray DVD player and has been adopted by Apple, Google (YouTube), Vimeo, Netflix and many other companies.

Although Flash has recently added support for H.264, the video on almost all Flash websites currently requires an older generation decoder that is not implemented in mobile chips and must be run in software. The difference is striking: on an iPhone, for example, H.264 videos play for up to 10 hours, while videos decoded in software play for less than 5 hours before the battery is fully drained.

When websites re-encode their videos using H.264, they can offer them without using Flash at all. They play perfectly in browsers like Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome without any plugins whatsoever, and look great on iPhones, iPods and iPads.

Fifth, there’s Touch.

Flash was designed for PCs using mice, not for touch screens using fingers. For example, many Flash websites rely on “rollovers”, which pop up menus or other elements when the mouse arrow hovers over a specific spot. Apple’s revolutionary multi-touch interface doesn’t use a mouse, and there is no concept of a rollover. Most Flash websites will need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices. If developers need to rewrite their Flash websites, why not use modern technologies like HTML5, CSS and JavaScript?

Even if iPhones, iPods and iPads ran Flash, it would not solve the problem that most Flash websites need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices.

Sixth, the most important reason.

Besides the fact that Flash is closed and proprietary, has major technical drawbacks, and doesn’t support touch based devices, there is an even more important reason we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. We have discussed the downsides of using Flash to play video and interactive content from websites, but Adobe also wants developers to adopt Flash to create apps that run on our mobile devices.

We know from painful experience that letting a third party layer of software come between the platform and the developer ultimately results in sub-standard apps and hinders the enhancement and progress of the platform. If developers grow dependent on third party development libraries and tools, they can only take advantage of platform enhancements if and when the third party chooses to adopt the new features. We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers.

This becomes even worse if the third party is supplying a cross platform development tool. The third party may not adopt enhancements from one platform unless they are available on all of their supported platforms. Hence developers only have access to the lowest common denominator set of features. Again, we cannot accept an outcome where developers are blocked from using our innovations and enhancements because they are not available on our competitor’s platforms.

Flash is a cross platform development tool. It is not Adobe’s goal to help developers write the best iPhone, iPod and iPad apps. It is their goal to help developers write cross platform apps. And Adobe has been painfully slow to adopt enhancements to Apple’s platforms. For example, although Mac OS X has been shipping for almost 10 years now, Adobe just adopted it fully (Cocoa) two weeks ago when they shipped CS5. Adobe was the last major third party developer to fully adopt Mac OS X.

Our motivation is simple – we want to provide the most advanced and innovative platform to our developers, and we want them to stand directly on the shoulders of this platform and create the best apps the world has ever seen. We want to continually enhance the platform so developers can create even more amazing, powerful, fun and useful applications. Everyone wins – we sell more devices because we have the best apps, developers reach a wider and wider audience and customer base, and users are continually delighted by the best and broadest selection of apps on any platform.

Conclusions.

Flash was created during the PC era – for PCs and mice. Flash is a successful business for Adobe, and we can understand why they want to push it beyond PCs. But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards – all areas where Flash falls short.

The avalanche of media outlets offering their content for Apple’s mobile devices demonstrates that Flash is no longer necessary to watch video or consume any kind of web content. And the 200,000 apps on Apple’s App Store proves that Flash isn’t necessary for tens of thousands of developers to create graphically rich applications, including games.

New open standards created in the mobile era, such as HTML5, will win on mobile devices (and PCs too). Perhaps Adobe should focus more on creating great HTML5 tools for the future, and less on criticizing Apple for leaving the past behind.

Steve Jobs
April, 2010

thomasb

And Adobe has been painfully slow to adopt enhancements to Apple’s platforms. For example, although Mac OS X has been shipping for almost 10 years now, Adobe just adopted it fully (Cocoa) two weeks ago when they shipped CS5. Adobe was the last major third party developer to fully adopt Mac OS X.

Vi venter fortsatt på omskrivingen av Final Cut Pro! *sukk*

Ellers mange gode argumenter om hvorfor Flash ikke eksisterer på iPhone og iPad. Gøy med disse brevene fra Steve Jobs.

svenanders

Flash har ingen ting å gjøre på mobile enheter når det er bedre alternativer i anmarsj.

Amishen

Helt enig med Steve Jobs her. Han har flere gode argumenter for hvorfor Flash ikke er fremtiden. Liker at han på slutten gir dem et lite tips om hva deres framtidige business-strategi bør være.

Men jeg fatter ikke hvorfor han klager på at Adobe har vært treige med å gå over på cocoa, når deres egen Final Cut Studio-pakke ikke enda er omskrevet.

martin

Mange gode argumenter ja.

Jeg leste akkurat denne twittermeldingen fra @doyoufoster:

When Adobe responds to Apple, it will be in a PDF.

:-P

segrov

Apple kjører på med halvtynne bortforklaringer.

Skuffende.

Teknisk sett holder ingen av argumentene mål.

Taperne er alle oss som bruker Apple-dingser. Det er på tide å finne en litt mer ydmyk leverandør av surfebrett.

DanTheMan

Right on av Steve Jobs!
Ingen grunn til Flash noensinne.

Har hørt det med hover -knapper før, hvorfor skrive det om så det funker med Touch apparater, for å så måtte gjøre det igjen til HTML5, fordi Flash vil dø ut?
+ Flash er treigt.

Sigg

@Segrov
Kan du si litt mer om hvilke av argumentene som er tynne og, ikke minst, hvorfor du mener de er tynne?

Jeg for min del er glad for at noen i IT industrien setter hardt mot hardt for å få frem gode ÅPNE standarder på nettet. Samtidig forstår jeg godt at Apple vil sikre at fremdriften og kvaliteten i iPhone OS m. tredjeparts programvare ikke blir hindret av en annen tredjepart (jfr Jobs' siste argument).

segrov

@sigg, det er åpenlyst at "problemet" med Flash er at det truer Apples grep om utviklerne. Apples plutselige fascinasjon for åpne standarer er bullshit. F.eks har Apple sitt helt egne proprietære containerformat for h264.

I dag leser vi på Digi.no at Apple skal selge reklame gjennom sin monopol-løsning iAd, og krever titalls millioner pr. kampanje. Dette kunne ikke Apple ha gjort om de hadde hatt Flash ombord, for uten Flash har Apple i praksis monopol på premium reklame på iPhone/iPad.

Alle tekniske utfordringer Steve klager over, er jo akkurat det samme som Steve selv har feilet med. Vi vet at manglende h264-støtte i Flash faktisk skyldes Apple - og ikke Adobe - og takket være iPhone, er webutviklere nødt til å bygge to versjoner av mange nettsider. En versjon for alle, og en versjon for iPhone/ipad.

Steve innrømmer delvis selv at det er penger som er motivet for Flash-blokkaden i innledningen, så vi får bare håpe at adobe fortsetter å legge press på Apple slik at vi kan få en åpen iPhone-plattform.

Nils Otto Økern...

Morsomt med den flashbaserte annonsen øverst på denne artikkelen ;)

åttitre

Slik jeg ser det gjør Apple rett i å droppe Flash. Jeg synes debatten blir veldig smal og lite bredde om det globale som skjer i programmeringsverdenen. Hva skal man med Flash nå som vi har mange bedre valg? Hva er det Flash har som ikke HTML, CSS og jQuery har sammen f.eks? Flash er på vei ut, Apple vet jo dette og har gjort det i lang tid. Men Adobe vil ikke tape uten en kamp. De har jo satsa voldsomt på Flash i siste utgave av Adobe CS5.
Flash kan bare brukes ved å installere en plugin i nettleseren. Det er en stor flaskehals. Om Apple skulle annonsert ved bruk av Flash, ja det er som å drite på leggen.

Nei Flash er en utrydningstrua programart, og Adobe kjemper for å beholde bestanden!

amigavrak

@segrov, Flash er grusomt ressurskrevende på Mac, mens dette aldri har vært tilfelle på Windows – selv *uten* hardware-aksellerering. Dessuten er ikke bare Apple, men *alle* tjent med at h.264 blir standard fremfor det proprietære Flash-formatet.

segrov

@amigavrak - det er en myte at Flash er så elendig på Mac vs. PC.

Microsoft har riktignok gjort tilgjenglige en del api og ressurser som har gjort det lettere å få Flash til å kjøre smooth, men nå man måler CPU-load på en windows-pc vs Mac så kjører det ganske likt.

Det proprietære flashformatet er like proprietært som h264, og Apple har gjort akkurat som Adobe, nemlig laget sitt eget proprietære h264-format gjennom quicktime. Faktisk er quicktime-formatet mer proprietært en Flash, fordi flash tillater KUN at man bruker en helt ubesudlet, ren h264-strøm, mens quicktime pakker det inn i et .mov-filformat som KUN kan åpnes i Quicktime.

Apples omfavnelse av h264 er ikke snakk om åpne standarer, men om å tjene penger og intet annet. Det er ikke noe galt å tjene penger, men det er noe galt å snakke usant om konkurrenten Adobe, spesielt når Adobe har gjort mer for h264 som gjennombruddsformat en hva apple noensinne klarer å gjøre!

christergutten

Best. Letter. Ever. :)

amigavrak

@segrov

det er en myte at Flash er så elendig på Mac vs. PC. . . . men nå man måler CPU-load på en windows-pc vs Mac så kjører det ganske likt.

Kilde?

Det proprietære flashformatet er like proprietært som h264, og Apple har gjort akkurat som Adobe, nemlig laget sitt eget proprietære h264-format gjennom quicktime. Faktisk er quicktime-formatet mer proprietært en Flash, fordi flash tillater KUN at man bruker en helt ubesudlet, ren h264-strøm, mens quicktime pakker det inn i et .mov-filformat som KUN kan åpnes i Quicktime.

Skjønner du virkelig ikke forskjellen på h.264 i *programmet* QuickTime og h.264 i Web-innhold?

Apples omfavnelse av h264 er ikke snakk om åpne standarer, men om å tjene penger og intet annet. Det er ikke noe galt å tjene penger, men det er noe galt å snakke usant om konkurrenten Adobe, spesielt når Adobe har gjort mer for h264 som gjennombruddsformat en hva apple noensinne klarer å gjøre!

*host* bullshit *host*

HenrikWL

Brevet var overraskende ærlig, må jeg innrømme. Steve prøver nok å bagatellisere forretningsmotivasjonen her – den er nok større enn hva han liker å gi uttrykk for – og i tillegg så setter han likhetstegn mellom flash og video, noe som vel ikke kan sies å stemme helt.

Ut over dette så skal det godt gjøres å hevde at noe av det han sier er direkte feil.

@segrov: det ser ut til at du blander sammen ting her. H.264 er et videoformat, på samme måte som MPEG-4 og MPEG-2. H.264 er H.264 uansett hvem som leverer det. At Apple's .mov container er proprietær er det liten tvil om, men så har jeg også inntrykk av at den blir mindre og mindre brukt til fordel for .mp4 containeren.

Når det gjelder flash, så er jo dette langt mer enn et rent containerformat, men i den grad du kan se på flash som en container så er den vel så lukket som .mov containeren. Jeg kjenner ikke til detaljene angående .mov containeren, men når det gjelder flash så er du nødt til å bruke en avspiller levert av Adobe. De har åpnet opp en del i de senere år ved at de tillater at andre verktøy genererer flash-eksekverbar kode, men skal det kjøres så er du låst til Adobes kjøremiljø.

Og hvordan du mener det er Apples feil at Adobe har brukt snart et tiår på å portere sine Mac-produkter til Cocoa må du nesten forklare meg. Det lukter Adobe-apologisme lang vei.

Når det gjelder utsagnet ditt: «…og takket være iPhone, er webutviklere nødt til å bygge to versjoner av mange nettsider. En versjon for alle, og en versjon for iPhone/ipad.» så er jo dette direkte hårreisende. Hvis du skal lage rike websider nå, så lønner det seg å bruke dette årtusenets teknologi – hvilket ekskluderer flash. Jeg har enda til gode å se noe (som tilfører forretningsverdi) gjort i flash som ikke kan gjøres i HTML5, JavaScript og CSS.

cladi

@segrov
I en slik debatt er det redelig - slik jeg ser det - å informere sine meddebattanter om at man faktisk lever av å programmere flash.

kirerot

[quote="amigavrak"]

Apples omfavnelse av h264 er ikke snakk om åpne standarer, men om å tjene penger og intet annet. Det er ikke noe galt å tjene penger, men det er noe galt å snakke usant om konkurrenten Adobe, spesielt når Adobe har gjort mer for h264 som gjennombruddsformat en hva apple noensinne klarer å gjøre!

*host* bullshit *host*

Google kjøpte videokodek-firmaet On2, og det spekuleres i at Google vil gjøre VP8-kodeken til open source. VP8 er teknisk på høyden med H.264, blir det sagt.

Hvis Google faktisk gjør dette, og utfordrer Apples pushing av H.264 som standard for HTML5-video, så framstår ikke Steve Jobs som like mye idealist lenger. Apple har økonomiske interesser i H.264, blant annet gjennom MPEG-LA, som forvalter patentet for H.264.

Fram til 2016 vil ikke MPEG-LA kreve inn lisensavgifter for sluttbrukere av H.264, men hva skjer etter det, når H.264 er godt etablert som standard, og alle er avhengig av det?

Sett bort fra H.264, er det bra at en stor aktør som Apple fronter åpne standarder. Men verken Google eller Apple er idealister, i likhet med Microsoft.

jFrode

@segrov
Er du helt sikker på at Flash for PC og Mac er like bra/dårlig? Det er en betydelig forskjell på Flash på Mac og PC. I hvert fall på min Mac og min PC.

Mac - MacBook Pro 3.1 2,etellerannet Core2Duo og 6GB RAM.Flash får vifta til å gå bananas. Det gjør i og for seg ikke all verden da jeg sitter med lyden via hodetelefoner, men fortsatt er det mye som hakker.

PC - HP bærbar med 1,7 GHz Mobile Pentium og 1,5 GB RAM. Maskinen ble kjøpt inn i 2002 tror jeg. Flash kan hakke litt her og, men ikke på langt nær så mye.

Vinter-OL 2010. Jeg kan se sendingene på NRK på MBP'en i kjempeoppløsning.Eneste bismak er at jeg visstnok bruker MS teknologi, men det driter jeg sportsinteressert (type sofa) som jeg er. Kanskje noen med peiling kan fortelle meg hvorfor Silverlight ser bedre ut med tanke på nettTV. Er i grunn litt nysgjerrig.

Ellers så gjør FlashBlocker surfelivet mitt litt triveligere. Jeg trenger ikke lengre å lete gjennom mange faner for å finne siden med Flash som får viftene i panikkmodus. Det rare er at når jeg en sjelden gang booter maskinen inn i XP (Boot Camp), ja da er ikke Flash så ille lengre. Faktisk helt greit. Det er altså ikke HW, men noe annet. Hva det er skal ikke jeg si, men jeg leser såpass mye negativt om Flash/Mac at jeg heller til at det er en Flashgreie.

segrov

[quote="cladi"]@segrov
I en slik debatt er det redelig - slik jeg ser det - å informere sine meddebattanter om at man faktisk lever av å programmere flash.

for å være ærlig tjener jeg mye mer på å måtte lage ting kompatibelt med iPhone. Ja, jeg kan Flash, men jobber mye mer med html.

Men takk for at du forsøker å så tvil om integriteten min. Kledelig.

Marasmus

Det er det faktum at Flash i det store og hele er ressurskrevende, uavhengig av plattform, kombinert med det grove misbruket, som gjør Flash så provoserende for meg. Det er uhyrlig at det å surfe på nettet omtrent kan sidestilles med å bedrive tung videoredigering. Nettsurfing SKAL bruke minimalt med ressurser.

Datamaskinen jeg bruker på jobb, en forholdsvis kjapp XP-boks med 768MB RAM og en eller annen Pentium 4-prosessor, fungerer utmerket til det arbeidet jeg utfører. Men å surfe på nettet er en risikabel affære. Kommer jeg over større mengder Flash stopper alt opp, og det eneste jeg kan gjøre er å kjøre en ctrl-alt-del og drepe iexplore.exe. Hvis jeg er heldig bruker jeg ikke mer enn 3—4 minutter på det, og da er vi på den plattformen som behersker Flash best. Det bør da være rimelig åpenbart at jeg som forbruker etterhvert blir forbannet på Flash-terroren på nettet og helst ser at Flash forsvinner helt.

Jeg har ikke bruk for Flash-designelementer, Flash-annonser eller Flash-spill, og all video kan jeg se i MPEG-4 H.264-format om Jobs får det som han vil. Jeg nyter at Apple bruker sin makt til å kvele Flash og ønsker alle som forpester nettet med grovt Flash-misbruk alt ondt.

Det er helt klart noe galt med Flash når det er mindre frustrerende å bruke Flash-blokker og klikke på Flash-elementene man vil se, enn å se alt Flash-innholdet på nettet.

segrov

[quote="HenrikWL"]Brevet var overraskende ærlig, må jeg innrømme. Steve prøver nok å bagatellisere forretningsmotivasjonen her – den er nok større enn hva han liker å gi uttrykk for

Enig, men samtidig er det viktig å snakke ned fokuset på økonomi. Sånt selger ikke så bra ;)

[quote="HenrikWL"]Ut over dette så skal det godt gjøres å hevde at noe av det han sier er direkte feil.

Jeg fant flere ting som jeg mener er på grensen til usant F.eks.at Apples holdning er at nettet skal være basert på åpne standarer, men samtidig bruker de det lukkede .mov-formatet på sin egen nettside. Go figure?

[quote="HenrikWL"]@segrov: det ser ut til at du blander sammen ting her. H.264 er et videoformat, på samme måte som MPEG-4 og MPEG-2. H.264 er H.264 uansett hvem som leverer det. At Apple's .mov container er proprietær er det liten tvil om, men så har jeg også inntrykk av at den blir mindre og mindre brukt til fordel for .mp4 containeren.

Adobe Flash bruker h264 på en måte som gjør det lett for andre avspillere, f.eks. html5 eller quicktime, å spille innholdet. Det er derfor YouTube kune komme så raskt på beina med en HTML5-versjon, eller en iPod-applikasjon.

Apple har derimot pushet h264 gjennom sine proprietære containerformat, som krever apple-produkter som quicktime eller iphone/ipad. Se her: Apple bruker det proprietære mov på sine egne nettsider http://www.apple.com/iphone/guidedtour/ ?!?

Flash og Youtube er etter min mening den største pådriverene for h264 på nettet, og har i praksis drept Windows Media. Dette bør mac-folket være glade for, for vi husker da hvordan situasjonen var med f.eks. NRK og mac for noen få år siden..?

Det er spesielt dette perspektivet som gjør at jeg reagerer sterkt på Steve Jobs angrep på Flash. Det er direkte ufint å rakke ned på andre når man står til livet i skit og dårlig praksis selv.

Om man på død og liv skal konkurrere i åpenhet, vinner Flash overlegent over Apple.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Når det gjelder flash, så er jo dette langt mer enn et rent containerformat, men i den grad du kan se på flash som en container så er den vel så lukket som .mov containeren. Jeg kjenner ikke til detaljene angående .mov containeren, men når det gjelder flash så er du nødt til å bruke en avspiller levert av Adobe. De har åpnet opp en del i de senere år ved at de tillater at andre verktøy genererer flash-eksekverbar kode, men skal det kjøres så er du låst til Adobes kjøremiljø.

Det er vanskelig, nesten umulig, å bruke flash som containerformat for h264 og flv. Jeg mener det skal gå, men da følger du ikke Adobes guidelines.

Det har også kommet en del opensource-avspillere av flash de siste årene, men Adobes er det beste. Men jeg mener at det proprietære er en styrke hos både Apple og Adobe, så jeg skal ikke argumentere så mye på dette.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Og hvordan du mener det er Apples feil at Adobe har brukt snart et tiår på å portere sine Mac-produkter til Cocoa må du nesten forklare meg. Det lukter Adobe-apologisme lang vei.

Du har rett i at jeg forsvarer Adobe mer en nødvendig, men jeg liker å se ting fra flere sider, og i denne saken synes jeg Steve Jobs gjør Adobe stor urett.

Når det gjelder manglende hardware-støtte for å dekode h264 i flash, skyldes dette manglende api fra Apple. Det har Apple endelig gjort noe med i 10.6.3, så nå ser vi snart h264-filmer i flash som ikke belaster CPU.

Apple har gjennom å gå fra OS9 via powerpc, carbon, cocoa og sist et bytte til intel, og endelig 64bits støtte i osx, gjort det vanskelig for utviklere av store pakker å henge med. At Adobe ikke har en carbon-utgave av CS-pakka si klar før nå, må Apple også ta på seg en del av ansvaret for.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Når det gjelder utsagnet ditt: «…og takket være iPhone, er webutviklere nødt til å bygge to versjoner av mange nettsider. En versjon for alle, og en versjon for iPhone/ipad.» så er jo dette direkte hårreisende. Hvis du skal lage rike websider nå, så lønner det seg å bruke dette årtusenets teknologi – hvilket ekskluderer flash. Jeg har enda til gode å se noe (som tilfører forretningsverdi) gjort i flash som ikke kan gjøres i HTML5, JavaScript og CSS.

Per i dag er det mer tidkrevene å bygge en interaktiv opplevelse i HTML5 om man ønsker samme detaljfokus som i Flash. Jeg vil anslå 3-4 ganger mer tidkrevende. Om man i det hele tatt klarer å gjøre det samme i HTML5 da, som f.eks. lage en fullskjerms videospiller.

Men det er ikke meg i mot, fordi jeg lever av å bygge sånt. Jeg liker at prosjektene blir større i timene flere:)

Men Flash løser mange utfordringer raskere og enklere en hva HTML5 gjør, og noen ganger er det viktig å kunne levere noe raskt. Om 2-3 år blir dette mer likt tenker jeg, da har det kommet bedre verktøy for WYSWIYG editering av HTML5.

Norsgod

[qoute="segrov"]Det proprietære flashformatet er like proprietært som h264, og Apple har gjort akkurat som Adobe, nemlig laget sitt eget proprietære h264-format gjennom quicktime. Faktisk er quicktime-formatet mer proprietært en Flash, fordi flash tillater KUN at man bruker en helt ubesudlet, ren h264-strøm, mens quicktime pakker det inn i et .mov-filformat som KUN kan åpnes i Quicktime.[/qoute]

Er vel ikke helt sant, da er en .mov konteiner på like linje som AVI, FV4, MP4 osv. h264 er et kodings format som blant annet xvid, AVC, Proress osv.

For forklaring kan du titte her:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_container_formats
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_formats

så om din spiller video spiller støtter h264 er det likgylid om det er en .mov fil eller en annen konteiner.

HenrikWL

[quote="segrov"]
Jeg fant flere ting som jeg mener er på grensen til usant F.eks.at Apples holdning er at nettet skal være basert på åpne standarer, men samtidig bruker de det lukkede .mov-formatet på sin egen nettside. Go figure?

Mnja, nå synes jeg du maler fanden litt på veggen her. Jeg er enig i at det ikke henger på greip at de kun bruker sin egen proprietære .mov container på sine egne hjemmesider i stedet for .mp4 containeren som i prinsippet er samme sak, bare en internasjonal standard, men ut over det så har jeg vondt for å se Apple som spesielt lukket når det gjelder webinteraksjon.

Deres Webkit motor (som for øvrig er open source) er jo en av de mest standard-kompatible browsermotorene på markedet, og de har innebygget støtte for de fleste versjoner av RSS og Atom syndikeringsstandarder i mange applikasjoner i tillegg til programmeringsrammeverkene sine.

[quote="segrov"]Adobe Flash bruker h264 på en måte som gjør det lett for andre avspillere, f.eks. html5 eller quicktime, å spille innholdet. Det er derfor YouTube kune komme så raskt på beina med en HTML5-versjon, eller en iPod-applikasjon.

Ja, men det er jo intet annet enn positivt. Det betyr at det medfører liten kostnad ved å drive evolusjonen av video på web ett skritt videre mot en uavhengig standard. ;)

[quote="segrov"]Det er spesielt dette perspektivet som gjør at jeg reagerer sterkt på Steve Jobs angrep på Flash. Det er direkte ufint å rakke ned på andre når man står til livet i skit og dårlig praksis selv.

Jeg mener at man ikke kan sammenligne kontroll på egne produkter og i egne økosystem, med en situasjon hvor én enkelt aktør er nærmest allestedsnærværende på et sted som av natur er såpass plattformuavhengig som internett.

At BMW har full kontroll over alt som har med sin egen produktlinje å gjøre er overhodet ikke noe problem, men dersom BMW (og de fleste andre bilfabrikanter) hadde gjort seg avhengige av en enkelt tredjepart så ville vi hatt et problem.

[quote="segrov]Det har også kommet en del opensource-avspillere av flash de siste årene, men Adobes er det beste. Men jeg mener at det proprietære er en styrke hos både Apple og Adobe, så jeg skal ikke argumentere så mye på dette.[/quote]

Sannhet med modifikasjoner. Det stemmer at det finnes opensource-avspillere, men alle sammen avhenger av Adobes binærer for nøkkelfunksjonalitet.

Jeg er for øvrig enig i at proprietaritet (er det et ord?) kan være en styrke, men jeg mener altså at det at én enkelt aktør skal ha så mye makt i et miljø som av natur er så åpent og plattformuavhengig som internett i sum er negativt.

At en produsent er diktator og enehersker over egne produkter er normen i stort sett all industri, så det har jeg mindre problemer med.

[quote="segrov"Du har rett i at jeg forsvarer Adobe mer en nødvendig, men jeg liker å se ting fra flere sider, og i denne saken synes jeg Steve Jobs gjør Adobe stor urett.[/quote]

Tja, urett og urett, fru Blom. Vi må huske på at det er gigantiske korporasjoner vi snakker om her. Skolegårdsetikk er ikke gjeldende her. Det er snakk om endringer i handelsavtaler og forretningsforbindelser her – det vi leser og hører i media er salgs- og PR-fluff.

[quote="segrov"]Når det gjelder manglende hardware-støtte for å dekode h264 i flash, skyldes dette manglende api fra Apple. Det har Apple endelig gjort noe med i 10.6.3, så nå ser vi snart h264-filmer i flash som ikke belaster CPU.

Hardware-aksellerasjon har vært tilgjengelig siden 10.2, men det har krevd at Adobe porterte ting over til Cocoa, noe de av uforståelige grunner ikke har gjort.

Et annet element er jo at flash ikke har implementert noen form for hardware-aksellerasjon før nå nylig i flash 10.1.

[quote="segrov"]Per i dag er det mer tidkrevene å bygge en interaktiv opplevelse i HTML5 om man ønsker samme detaljfokus som i Flash. Jeg vil anslå 3-4 ganger mer tidkrevende. Om man i det hele tatt klarer å gjøre det samme i HTML5 da, som f.eks. lage en fullskjerms videospiller.

Og her har vi vel litt av problemet med at flash har blitt såpass dominerende som det har blitt. Det har så mye moment at det er fryktelig lett for den enkelte å kaste opp hendene og si at flash er enkleste utvei.

Det blir ikke før en ny generasjon med webutviklere gjør ting i HTML5 raskere enn du gjør i flash at det vil bli aktuelt for deg å bytte. Jeg vil dog råde deg til å skifte fokus allerede, slik at du er «frampå». ;)

Fullskjermvideo i HTML5 er støttet i Webkit nightly builds as we speak.

Kan du gjøre [url=http://craftymind.com/factory/html5video/CanvasVideo.html]dette i flash? Se for øvrig også [url=http://mugtug.com/sketchpad/]Paint implementert med HTML5, JavaScript og CSS.

Poenget mitt er uansett at når nå Apple med sine megapopulære gagdets tvinger webutviklere til å lage HTML5 versjoner vil det bli mindre og mindre behov for flash. Jeg hører folk si at «man må lage en versjon for iPhone/iPad, og en for alle andre». Det er jo helt bakvendt. iPhone/iPad versjonen er den som er for alle. Flash-versjonen er kun for de plattformer som Adobe har valgt å støtte. ;)

segrov

[quote="HenrikWL"]…. Jeg er enig i at det ikke henger på greip at de kun bruker sin egen proprietære .mov container på sine egne hjemmesider i stedet for .mp4 containeren som i prinsippet er samme sak, bare en internasjonal standard, men ut over det så har jeg vondt for å se Apple som spesielt lukket når det gjelder webinteraksjon.

.mp4 er mpegs egen standard, i samband med h264. Apples strategi minner litt om Microsoft EEE.

Flash derimot bruker h264 slik det er beskrevet av Mpeg.

Apple er altså mer lukket omkring h264 en Adobe. Flash fungerer bare som et applikasjonslag over h264-strømmen, og man står fritt for å bruke andre videolesere.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Ja, men det er jo intet annet enn positivt. Det betyr at det medfører liten kostnad ved å drive evolusjonen av video på web ett skritt videre mot en uavhengig standard. ;)

Bra, da er vi enige i at Flash med andre ord positivt for h264, for uten Flash hadde dette aldri vært mulig, men vi hadde fortsatt sittet til livet i propritære formater som Windows Media Video. Eller Quicktime for den saks skyld.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Jeg mener at man ikke kan sammenligne kontroll på egne produkter og i egne økosystem, med en situasjon hvor én enkelt aktør er nærmest allestedsnærværende på et sted som av natur er såpass plattformuavhengig som internett.

Det er fordi flash løser problemer på en bedre måte. Uten flash, blir det mer problemer.

Heldigvis tilater HTML-standaren plugins, slik at standarbaserte nettlesere som VIRKELIG støtter standaren, tillater at man bruker plugins. Men vent - Webkit for Iphone tillater jo ikke plugins?!?! Kan det være at iPhone ikke er så standard-vennlig som det skal være.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Hardware-aksellerasjon har vært tilgjengelig siden 10.2, men det har krevd at Adobe porterte ting over til Cocoa, noe de av uforståelige grunner ikke har gjort.

Mine kilder har overbevisende argumenter for at Adobe har rett: Apple har aldri gjort tilgjengelig nødvendige APIer for plugin-strukturen til nettlesere. Den eneste måte å gjøre dette på frem til nå, er via et hack.

har du dokumentasjon på at cocoa-konvertering hadde løst det problemet?

[quote="HenrikWL"]Det blir ikke før en ny generasjon med webutviklere gjør ting i HTML5 raskere enn du gjør i flash at det vil bli aktuelt for deg å bytte. Jeg vil dog råde deg til å skifte fokus allerede, slik at du er «frampå». ;),

Jeg jobber med det du kaller html5 (skjønt det er ikke html5, det finnes ikke enda, så man bruker f.eks. xhtml strict med css2 og javascript for å dekke over alle feilene som finnes i alle nettleserne. Det er et ormebol av hull og mangler, men det er som sagt supert for det presser prisene på utvikling av nettsider oppover. Det er god business:)

Spesielt god business er det at man må begynne å lage 2 versjoner av alle nettsider, slik at det går raskt og smooth på iPhone. Det er akkurat som i gamle dager, bortsett fra at nå er det Apple som oppfører seg som MS og skaper problemer.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Kan du gjøre [url=http://craftymind.com/factory/html5video/CanvasVideo.html]dette i flash? Se for øvrig også [url=http://mugtug.com/sketchpad/]Paint implementert med HTML5, JavaScript og CSS.

Opps, fungerer bare i enkelte nettleser, gitt. Godt det finnes flash:)

Poenget mitt er uansett at når nå Apple med sine megapopulære gagdets tvinger webutviklere til å lage HTML5 versjoner vil det bli mindre og mindre behov for flash. Jeg hører folk si at «man må lage en versjon for iPhone/iPad, og en for alle andre». Det er jo helt bakvendt. iPhone/iPad versjonen er den som er for alle. Flash-versjonen er kun for de plattformer som Adobe har valgt å støtte. ;)

fredarn

Håper det blir mindre flash på nettet snart, det gjør Macen min så utrolig mye tregere :(

Yogi

[quote="segrov"]Flash og Youtube er etter min mening den største pådriverene for h264 på nettet, og har i praksis drept Windows Media. Dette bør mac-folket være glade for, for vi husker da hvordan situasjonen var med f.eks. NRK og mac for noen få år siden..?

Fordi flash banet vei for silverlight? Hva har flash med NRK og mac å gjøre lissom?

segrov

Yogi, før YouTube (som ble pop fordi den brukte Flash) fantes det nesten ingen videotjenester som fungerte spesielt godt på mac.

Du kan takke Flash for at du nå kan velge og vrake i videotjenester til macen din.

Loke

FSF sine tanker på Apple VS Adobe. Mandatory reading for A* zealots :)

Loke

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2010/04/pot-meet-kettle-a-response-to-steve-jobs-letter-on-flash.ars

HenrikWL

[quote="segrov"]Apple er altså mer lukket omkring h264 en Adobe. Flash fungerer bare som et applikasjonslag over h264-strømmen, og man står fritt for å bruke andre videolesere.

Det er ingen konkurranse dette her. Vi er enige om at både Adobe og Apple er lukket, om enn på forskjellige måter.

Det vi er uenige om er hvor slik lukking er bra og hvor det er dårlig. Det ser også ut til at du ikke evner å se forskjellen på at Apple bruker sitt lukkede .mov format på sitt eget nettsted som eneste aktør på hele nettet, og det at Adobes plugin er nærmest påkrevd på store deler av nettet.

Hadde Apple hatt total markedsdominans på video på Web, og så insistert på å bruke .mov hadde det vært et like stort problem som at Adobe er i den posisjonen i dag. Det er de dog ikke.

[quote="segrov"]Heldigvis tilater HTML-standaren plugins, slik at standarbaserte nettlesere som VIRKELIG støtter standaren, tillater at man bruker plugins. Men vent - Webkit for Iphone tillater jo ikke plugins?!?! Kan det være at iPhone ikke er så standard-vennlig som det skal være.

At HTML-standarden definerer plugins som en mulighet minker ikke den ødeleggende effekten av at én bestemt plugin levert av én bestemt leverandør er nærmest påkrevd på veldig mange nettsider.

At ISO-koblingen i dashbordet på biler gjør det lett å bytte ut CD-spiller er positivt, men dersom en CD-spillerleverandør har kommet i den posisjonen at bilene ikke vil kjøre på alle veiene med mindre de er utstyrt med CD-spiller levert av denne leverandøren så spiller det ingen rolle om disse CD-spillerne etterlever ISO-standarden.

[quote="segrov"]Mine kilder har overbevisende argumenter for at Adobe har rett: Apple har aldri gjort tilgjengelig nødvendige APIer for plugin-strukturen til nettlesere. Den eneste måte å gjøre dette på frem til nå, er via et hack.

har du dokumentasjon på at cocoa-konvertering hadde løst det problemet?

Denne stien er en blindvei. Du har dine kilder med sine argumenter, jeg har mine kilder med mine, og jeg vil tro at vi begge har like lite håndfast dokumentasjon ut over en tillit til at «våre folk» vet hva de snakker om.

Det er dog en tankevekker at Adobe ser ut til å være de eneste som har så store problemer med Apples API'er. Det tyder på enten manglende vilje, manglende evne eller regelrett dårlig design. Jeg heller mot å anta at det er en kombinasjon av førstnevnte og sistnevnte.

[quote="segrov"]Jeg jobber med det du kaller html5 (skjønt det er ikke html5, det finnes ikke enda, så man bruker f.eks. xhtml strict med css2 og javascript for å dekke over alle feilene som finnes i alle nettleserne. Det er et ormebol av hull og mangler, men det er som sagt supert for det presser prisene på utvikling av nettsider oppover. Det er god business:)

Spesielt god business er det at man må begynne å lage 2 versjoner av alle nettsider, slik at det går raskt og smooth på iPhone. Det er akkurat som i gamle dager, bortsett fra at nå er det Apple som oppfører seg som MS og skaper problemer.

Ehh, nei? Stikk motsatt?

I gamle dager, når IE var dominerende, skrev mange webutviklere mot IE sitt proprietære opplegg. Når andre, mer standard-vennlige browsere dukket opp måtte webutviklere skrive 2 versjoner; en optimalisert for IE og en standard-versjon for alle andre.

I dag, når Adobe er dominerende, skriver mange webutviklere mot deres proprietære opplegg. Når nå HTML5-standarden er på fremmarsj må man skrive to versjoner: én mot Adobes proprietære, gammeldags teknologi, og én standard-versjon for de med moderne webbrowsere – og her er Apple en pådriver, uavhengig av bakenforliggende motiver.

[quote="segrov"]Opps, fungerer bare i enkelte nettleser, gitt. Godt det finnes flash:)

Det fungerer i alle moderne, standardvennlige browsere. ;) I motsetning til flash-sider, som bare fungerer på plattformer der Adobe leverer sin tredjeparts, proprietære plugin.

Som en kommentar til Ars Technica artikkelen, så er det ikke annet enn å forvente at de høytflyvende idealistene i FSF ser på dette som en gylden mulighet til å fremme fordelene ved deres elskede frie programvare. De er dog blendet av idealistenes absoluttisme: proprietaritet er alltid negativt, uansett. Dette er så klart tull. Nevn ett eneste initiativ fra den leiren som har tilgjengeliggjort teknologi på en så rett-fram måte for så mange ikke-tekniske brukere som det Apple har med sine produkter.

Problemet med FSF er at de stort sett består av teknologer og nerder, og således mangler evne til å se at de idealene de brenner så varmt for stort sett er irrelevante for majoriteten av verdens befolkning. Joe User driter i hvordan dingsen han har kjøpt er laget og hvordan den fungerer, så lenge den fungerer slik selgeren sa den ville gjøre og ikke gir ham for mye hodepine.

segrov

[quote="HenrikWL"]Det vi er uenige om er hvor slik lukking er bra og hvor det er dårlig. Det ser også ut til at du ikke evner å se forskjellen på at Apple bruker sitt lukkede .mov format på sitt eget nettsted som eneste aktør på hele nettet, og det at Adobes plugin er nærmest påkrevd på store deler av nettet.

Det er fordi plugins er populært og folk ønsker å bruke plugins. Dessverre bryer apple html-standarden og ødelegger for plugins, og dermed er Apples brukere låst. Jeg ser ingenting postitivt med Apples "løsning" på dette.

Apple hadde derimot hatt mye å lære av Adobe på dette punktet.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Hadde Apple hatt total markedsdominans på video på Web, og så insistert på å bruke .mov hadde det vært et like stort problem som at Adobe er i den posisjonen i dag. Det er de dog ikke.

Apple har en total dominanse i et voksende segment, og bruker sin markedsmakt på å ødelegge for andre aktører ved å over natta introdusere regler som ødelegger for Adobe (sikter til App Store-nekten). Apple står de selvsagt fritt til å bestemme hva de skal selge i nettbutikken sin, men Steve burde slutte å fremstille seg selv som spesielt åpen når han gjør slike grep.

[quote="HenrikWL"]At HTML-standarden definerer plugins som en mulighet minker ikke den ødeleggende effekten av at én bestemt plugin levert av én bestemt leverandør er nærmest påkrevd på veldig mange nettsider.

Apple bryter HTML-standarden når de nekter å følge deler av denne.

[quote="HenrikWL"][quote="segrov"]har du dokumentasjon på at cocoa-konvertering hadde løst det problemet?

Denne stien er en blindvei. Du har dine kilder med sine argumenter, jeg har mine kilder med mine, og jeg vil tro at vi begge har like lite håndfast dokumentasjon ut over en tillit til at «våre folk» vet hva de snakker om.

Har du ikke mer håndfaste kilder en dette, så kan jeg ikke ta påstanden din alvorlig.

Men et hint: for noen år siden gikk jeg høyt ut og la jeg all skyld på adobe for Flash-støtten var såpass dårlig... Etter å ha satt meg bedre inn i saken måtte jeg endre syn, og innrømme at Apple har gjort noen uheldige grep.

DU må spørre deg selv hvorfor alle store programmer (Quark, Office, Adobe, Firefox ) til Mac har brukt en evighet på å bli konvertert til Cocoa.

Selv ikke Apples Final Cut eller iTunes er Cocoa, så der forsvinner argumentet ditt om at Adobe er eneste som har problemer med Apples APIer.

[quote="HenrikWL"] Det fungerer i alle moderne, standardvennlige browsere. ;) I motsetning til flash-sider, som bare fungerer på plattformer der Adobe leverer sin tredjeparts, proprietære plugin.

DVS: omtrent samtlige plattformer som benyttes på nett bortsett fra iPhone, siden Apple bryter HTML-standarden ved i ikke tillate plugins.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Problemet med FSF er at de stort sett består av teknologer og nerder, og således mangler evne til å se at de idealene de brenner så varmt for stort sett er irrelevante for majoriteten av verdens befolkning.

Kanskje de er nerder, men de avslører keiserens nye klær når Steve Jobs forsøker å fremstille seg som åpen.

ggt667

Flash suger rumpe, Adobe tar ikke ansvar, HTML 5 er en realitet.

HenrikWL

[quote="segrov"][
Det er fordi plugins er populært og folk ønsker å bruke plugins. Dessverre bryer apple html-standarden og ødelegger for plugins, og dermed er Apples brukere låst. Jeg ser ingenting postitivt med Apples "løsning" på dette.

Nå begynner det å bli tullete her. På hvilken måte ødelegger Apple for plugins?

Det finnes ingen plugin-standard relatert til HTML – HTML definerer et par tagger (embed og object) som lar webutviklere indikere til browseren at et gitt innhold skal håndteres spesielt, men HTML definerer ingen plugin-standard.

Den standarden du tenker på er antakelig NPAPI (Netscape Plugin API), som implementeres av de aller, aller fleste browsere. Safari har også støtte for NPAPI plugins.

Det Safari tilbyr i tillegg, er såkalte «Webkit plugins», som er Mac-plattformens svar på ActiveX på Windows – et native interface som lar webinnhold interagere med Cocoa rammeverket.

Adobes flash-plugin på Mac plattformen er så vidt meg bekjent en NPAPI plugin; det Adobe kunne gjort for å bedre ytelsen var å gå over til å skrive en native Webkit plugin (slik de har skrevet en ActiveX plugin for Windows).

[quote="segrov"]Apple har en total dominanse i et voksende segment, og bruker sin markedsmakt på å ødelegge for andre aktører ved å over natta introdusere regler som ødelegger for Adobe (sikter til App Store-nekten). Apple står de selvsagt fritt til å bestemme hva de skal selge i nettbutikken sin, men Steve burde slutte å fremstille seg selv som spesielt åpen når han gjør slike grep.

Hvis du ikke ser forskjell på det at en aktør designer sin egen hjemmeside på en slik måte at den låser brukerne til aktørens programvare, og det at store mengder aktører på nettet utformer sine hjemmesider på en slik måte at brukerne blir låst til én enkelt tredjeparts programvare så kan jeg virkelig ikke hjelpe deg.

[quote="segrov"]Har du ikke mer håndfaste kilder en dette, så kan jeg ikke ta påstanden din alvorlig.

Nei, det er nettopp det… Du tar min påstand omtrent like alvorlig som jeg tar din, tenker jeg. ;)

[quote="segrov"]DU må spørre deg selv hvorfor alle store programmer (Quark, Office, Adobe, Firefox ) til Mac har brukt en evighet på å bli konvertert til Cocoa.

Selv ikke Apples Final Cut eller iTunes er Cocoa, så der forsvinner argumentet ditt om at Adobe er eneste som har problemer med Apples APIer.

Det kan jeg for så vidt fortelle deg. Dette henger sammen med Quicktime. I motsetning til hva mange tror, så er ikke Quicktime bare en videospiller – Quicktime er et omfattende videoredigerings-, streaming-, encoding- og decoding-rammeverk som er grundig innflettet i OS X og som dermed tar lang tid å portere. Dette er årsaken til at Quicktime X (Cocoa-implementasjonen av Quicktime) og Quicktime 7 (den gamle implementasjonen) sameksisterer, siden Quicktime X enda ikke er feature complete i forhold til Quicktime 7.

Final Cut Pro og iTunes er begge to avhengige av Quicktime, og de kan ikke implementeres i Cocoa før Quicktime X er mer ferdig enn det det er i dag.

At store programpakker tar lang tid å portere er selvsagt forståelig. Men det finnes da en rimelighetens grense.

[quote="segrov"]DVS: omtrent samtlige plattformer som benyttes på nett bortsett fra iPhone, siden Apple bryter HTML-standarden ved i ikke tillate plugins.

Fy skam! Nettopp denne holdningen var det som gjorde at folk måtte slite (og fortsatt sliter) med IE6 og websider og -applikasjoner tilpasset denne.

Det gjør jo ingenting å gjøre seg avhengig av én leverandør så lenge den har tilnærmet monopol, sant? Joda. Helt til dagen da denne leverandøren ikke lenger er så dominerende. Få av deg skypappene.

segrov

[quote="HenrikWL"]Nå begynner det å bli tullete her. På hvilken måte ødelegger Apple for plugins?

Apple tillater ikke plugins i safari mobile (bortsett fra en versjon av Quicktime for å spille sine egne, proprietære formater da).

[quote="HenrikWL"]Det finnes ingen plugin-standard relatert til HTML – HTML definerer et par tagger (embed og object) som lar webutviklere indikere til browseren at et gitt innhold skal håndteres spesielt, men HTML definerer ingen plugin-standard.

Embed og Object er laget fordi HTML er designet for å brukes sammen med Plugins. men Apple tillater ikke 3departs plugins, og er standaren brutt, siden taggene ikke kan brukes til det de er designet for.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Nei, det er nettopp det… Du tar min påstand omtrent like alvorlig som jeg tar din, tenker jeg. ;)

Jeg mistenker deg for å være litt fanboi, som ikke ønsker å se saken fra flere sider. Men du kan gjerne overaske meg 8-)

[quote="HenrikWL"]Det kan jeg for så vidt fortelle deg. Dette henger sammen med Quicktime. I motsetning til hva mange tror, så er ikke Quicktime bare en videospiller – Quicktime er et omfattende videoredigerings-, streaming-, encoding- og decoding-rammeverk som er grundig innflettet i OS X og som dermed tar lang tid å portere. Dette er årsaken til at Quicktime X (Cocoa-implementasjonen av Quicktime) og Quicktime 7 (den gamle implementasjonen) sameksisterer, siden Quicktime X enda ikke er feature complete i forhold til Quicktime 7.

Final Cut Pro og iTunes er begge to avhengige av Quicktime, og de kan ikke implementeres i Cocoa før Quicktime X er mer ferdig enn det det er i dag.

Ok, så da vet du altså at Apple ikke har konvertert svært store programpakker til Mac. Men Adobe-programmer - som er langt mer komplekse og som bruker Quicktime svært aktivt – kritiserer du for å være i Carbon. Og du UNNLATER å nevne at Adobe har vært før Apple med Cocoa-applikasjoner i flere segmenter.

Motstanden mot Adobe ikke er spesielt rasjonell.

[quote="HenrikWL"]Fy skam! Nettopp denne holdningen var det som gjorde at folk måtte slite (og fortsatt sliter) med IE6 og websider og -applikasjoner tilpasset denne.

Det gjør jo ingenting å gjøre seg avhengig av én leverandør så lenge den har tilnærmet monopol, sant? Joda. Helt til dagen da denne leverandøren ikke lenger er så dominerende. Få av deg skypappene.

*sukk* Så var det det med hvem som er verst, da...

Flash er gjør deg mindre avhengig av en leverandør en Apple. Flash er bare software og kan erstattes. Apple lager Hardware, og man må selge hele sulamitten om man føler at Apple har låst deg inn i en krok hvor du ikke trives.

Nå tror jeg ikke vi kommer noen vei videre, så for å oppsummere: Apple og Adober er begge proprietære, men Apple er noen hakk mer thight en Adobe, og er derfor i en meget dårlig posisjon for å kritisere Adobe.

jFrode

Dette går sånn rent teknisk langt ut over min fatteevne, men jeg er fortsatt nysgjerrig på hvorfor det å se video gjennom Silverlight ser ut til å fungere så mye bedre enn gjennom/via Flash. Ønsker ikke å blande meg inn i den tekniske diskusjonen, men er rett og slett nysgjerrig. Wergland/Segrov kan kanskje oppkalre dette for meg, om ikke kan jeg jo alltids prøve å Google.

frode

segrov

Godt spørsmål, jFrode.

Svaret er en lang utredning.

Kort fortalt er forskjellene mellom Silverlight og Flash minimale når man optimaliserer koden godt.

Men Silverlight har tre fordeler:
• Man programmerer ofte silverlight i C, og stort sett proffe programmere som lager Silverlight-applikasjonene = bedre ytelse

• Silverlight på Mac bruker GPU istedet for CPU - (men kun i fullskjerm, siden Apples API ikke har tillatt dette for plugins embedded i siden før intill nylig).

• Silverlight må ikke dele CPU på 20 flasher på en nettside som er minimert eller ligger i bakgrunnen, siden Silverlight ikke brukes til reklame

jFrode

Takk for svar. Håper og at Flash blir løftet seg litt for oss med relativt gammel HW etterhvert. Er fortsatt godt fornøyd med min MBP og kunne tenke meg å ha den i bruke 2-3 år til. Da ble den likevel ikke så dyr i innkjøp når man fordeler det over 5-6 år :-)

devo

Det er helt tåpelig at folk går på personen Steve Jobs i dette tilfellet. Alle vet at Flash er dødt, Steve er bare den eneste som tør ytre noe. Og, med en gang det skjer, så kommer alle krekene krypende for å hyle mot Steve, og de klager over alt fra uforutsigbare App Store-godkjenninger til mangelen på nettop Flash. De har glemt at ingen har tvunget dem til å benytte Apples platform.

Men, den klagingen hadde vært forståelig, og berettiget, hvis Apple var monopolister, og samtidig hadde drevet App Store med hard hånd i flere tiår. Men, nei. Apple er et forholdsvis lite firma (sammenlign med Nokia). Og App Store, og dets prosesser og retningslinjer er også forholdsvis ferske. Nå er nettop Opera godkjent. Hvem ville trodd det?

Alt dette skjer fordi Steve Jobs er en mann med et mål i hodet: Sømløs brukeropplevelse. Både i hardware og software. Og da er det ikke rart at kritikerne hyler når han møter motgang på sin vei. For det er jo for pokker meg mulig å velge noe anna en Apple og sine platformer? Get real...

MacSe

Apple tjener penger, skulle bare mangle (alle vet hvorfor)?

- Det som er microsoftslavenes store problem er at de tror Apple vil behandle de på samme måte som Microsoft.

Apple gjør nok ikke det, men de driver etter eldre prinsipper for forretningsføring - næring etter tæring osv.

Microsoft har utnyttet "monopolet" sitt på en helt annen (moderne) måte...

Det er nok derfor gamle kunder er sure - men det er ikke Apples skyld.

:)

ggt667

Det største problemet med flash er at Apple platformen har blitt ignorert alt for lenge.

taG

[quote="segrov"]Yogi, før YouTube (som ble pop fordi den brukte Flash) fantes det nesten ingen videotjenester som fungerte spesielt godt på mac.
Youtube ble ikke pop fordi den brukte Flash, men på grunn av mye morsomt innhold.

Det ble også tidlig i tråden spurt hva Flash har som HTML/java/css ikke har og svaret er et helhetlig utviklingsverktøy med tidslinje. Flash gjør det lett for innholdsskapere og designere å lage en interaktiv brukeropplevelse uten å jobbe for mye med tre-fire ulike kodespråk og ulike rammeverk. Det aller beste hadde vært om Adobe lot Flash-formatet ligge og heller omfavnet de nye standardene og laget et like godt verktøy basert på disse.

  • Skriv ut artikkel
  • Abonner med RSS

Alt om Apple iPad

Følg oss på Twitter!

Følg i1 på Twitter

Nettradio i iTunes
100 norske radiokanaler.
Få de mest populære norske, svenske og danske radiokanalene inn i en egen spilleliste i iTunes.
Oppdatert 13. mai.